January-February 2011 | VIVA VENEZIA!

Cheryl Nemazie
VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!VIVA VENEZIA!

ARTISTICALLY SPEAKING

VIVA VENEZIA!

Photographer and award-winning designer Cheryl Nemazie takes a dreamy sojourn through the ancient canals of Venice and brings Coastal Style along for the ride

When a group of friends asked if I wanted to split the costs on a flat in Venice for a couple of weeks, I didn't hesitate. Our June trip was timed for the Venice Biennale (the Olympics of the art world) and put us in the city during a peak tourist time.

My challenge came in capturing the essence of the city without crowds of people obscuring the views. Early morning was the perfect time to avoid the crowds and capture idyllic scenes of gondolas and colorful boats moored alongside picturesque canals. And from a photographic perspective, early morning brings about some of the most beautiful lighting.

Another great time to shoot is late in the day, when the shadows are long and a lovely golden hue settles on the landscape. In a vacation paradise, however, this is the time when people are living large. Outdoor cafes are filled, and crowds are bustling to catch the last viewings at museums and cathedrals. Patience, therefore, is an especially important virtue for a photographer. I travel with a lightweight (carbonite) tripod, so once I find the composition I want, I set up my camera and just wait.

I wait for the right people to move in (or out) of a shot. I wait for the light to shift just so to bring out the aged copper patina of a statue or perhaps the gold gilt of a gondola.
Then, as tourists are settling into their dinner plans and the sun has dipped just beyond the horizon, comes my favorite time of light: blue hour. It is still bright enough to pick up the surrounding background yet dark enough for the streetlights and window lamps to show up… and everything is bathed in a gorgeous blue hue.

My image of St. Mark's was taken late at night, so there are streaks of light where someone in a colorful jacket has walked through my composition. The lights of the lone vendor's cart burn in, creating a point of focus for the image. In general, the people milling about the square that time of night are inconsequential, as they are not in any one place long enough to show up in the final image.

The Venice trip proved to be an inspirational mother lode for me as a photographer. It will take a few years of contemplation and editing of all of the images I captured, but it has garnered three Venice shows to date in 2010-11, each with a different theme.
“Venice at Work” was the theme for my foyer gallery show at the AI&G in Salisbury this past summer. After the show at Viva Espresso in Salisbury (through Jan. 31), I will be preparing for a show at Salisbury University, titled “Venice Up-Close.” Venice was also the impetus for my ongoing series, “Change is the Constant,” which exhibited at Bishop's Stock in Snow Hill last March and is currently on display at Black Ankle Vineyards in Mt. Airy, Md.
 

Studio C : Cheryl Nemazie
410-860-8559
www.cherylnemazie.com

  


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